Lamont Announces Funding for Walk Bridge and Connecticut River Projects

Gov. Ned Lamont and members of Connecticut’s congressional delegation announced on Friday that the state has received a $144 million grant — part of the Federal-State Partnership for State of Good Repair Grant Program — toward the replacement of the Walk Bridge and the Connecticut River Bridge. The Connecticut River Bridge, which opens and closes more than 3000 times a year, was constructed in 1907 and is the oldest movable bridge between Boston and New Haven. The project will replace the existing structure with a new bascule bridge 52 feet to the south. State Rep. Devin Carney, R-Old Lyme, contacted by

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State Invites Comment on Draft Four-Year $3.9 Billion Transportation Program

The Connecticut Department of Transportation continues work on plans to remove the two traffic signals on Route 9 in Middletown, one of 223 projects included in the draft 2021 State Transportation Improvement Program, or STIP. The draft is the topic of two virtual public information meetings to be held on Sept. 23, at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. The public is also invited to review and comment on the draft program of projects, as well as Public Involvement Procedures, until Oct. 9.  Middletown project The Middletown project began under the Malloy administration as a way to improve safety conditions and

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Five Things to Know About the DMV as Connecticut Opens for Business

With the phased reopening of Connecticut’s economy and government functions underway, many individuals across the state are wondering when the Department of Motor Vehicles will open its doors for tests, licenses and registrations. For now, the answer to most of those continues to be “not yet.” The department is expecting a substantial backlog of services required and tests that will need to be performed when they finally do reopen their doors. How that backlog will be cleared up, and whether that will require additional hours or staff, has not yet been decided. Here are five things to know about what

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$400 Million Connecticut River Railroad Bridge Replacement Takes a Step Forward, Design Details Announced

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A significant but relatively little known plan is underway to replace the aging railroad lift bridge that spans the Connecticut River between Old Lyme and Old Saybrook. The estimated $400 million project, proposed by Amtrak, would construct a new bascule bridge 52 feet south of the existing structure. The original bridge, which dates back to 1907, is an essential link on the Northeast Rail Corridor between Boston and Washington, D.C. and would remain operational during construction. The existing structure will be largely removed once the new bridge is completed.  Though few town officials seemed to know about the plan, it resurfaced

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Fatalities Rise Despite 50% Drop in Traffic Across Connecticut

Despite a 50 percent drop in traffic from mid-March through the end of April, fatalities on the roads across Connecticut have increased. Between January 1 and April 30 of this year there were 87 fatalities on the road compared with 62 in 2019 and 81 in 2018 during the same period. “It’s astounding to me that despite the big drop off in traffic volumes and the big drop off in total crashes, the number of fatalities has not gone down. It’s either gone up significantly or is about the same,” said Tom Maziarz, the chief of policy and planning for

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Connecticut Pushes Ahead on Transportation Projects as Revenues Plummet

Traffic has dropped 50 percent across the state and nation, oil prices have collapsed and state transportation departments relying on fuel taxes are losing revenue – but the Connecticut Department of Transportation isn’t cutting back on any projects just yet. Transportation officials in states across the country – including Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania – are already scaling back planned highway projects or furloughing workers as they expect more people staying home will mean less revenue from key sources of funding, including the gas tax.  Connecticut Department of Transportation Spokesman Kevin Nursick said the state hasn’t cutback yet.

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Surprise Cut to Waterbury and Danbury Line Funding Raises Hackles at Bond Hearing – New Rail Cars for Shore Line East

The State Bond Commission approved a proposal to spend $300 million of special transportation funding on 60 new rail cars for Shore Line East and the Hartford Line. No bond funding was allocated to either the Waterbury or Danbury lines. “We don’t have an endless supply of bonding money, especially in the Special Transportation Fund. We probably discussed this ad nauseam last year. Because we didn’t get new revenues in there, the Special Transportation Fund is slowly running dry. We had to set some priorities for what we spend it on,” said Governor Ned Lamont at a virtual commission meeting.

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COVID-19 Closures Ease Roadwork Constraints, Says Connecticut Department of Transportation

Efforts to limit the spread of COVID-19 have led to significant work slowdowns across many parts of the economy over the last six weeks, but with half the usual traffic on roads across Connecticut, the state Department of Transportation says that it has taken the opportunity to increase road work efficiency. “Typically, we have limitations on lane closures and other work activities that would detrimentally impact motorists — particularly during peak travel times,” said Kevin Nursick, spokesperson for the department. “As a result of COVID, and drastically reduced traffic volumes, we are able to expand allowable lane closure times, duration

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Jahncke: Tolling Revenues Won’t Add Up

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There’s a new game in Connecticut. It’s called dodge-a-gantry. Right now, it is only a virtual game being played on Google Maps. Governor Lamont latest toll plan – he’s had many – is to toll only tractor-trailer trucks at just 12 highway bridges in the state. So what are truckers doing? They are getting ready to game Lamont’s proposed system. They are researching the best toll evasion routes, i.e. the best local roads to use to bypass the intended highway gantry locations. The governor and his advisors have failed to take into account a unique and fundamental obstacle to imposing

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Connecticut Department of Transportation Explains New Traffic Cameras in East Lyme

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Every year the state department of transportation invests more than $10 million in replacing, installing and updating traffic signals. For the past couple years these projects have included cameras. “The signal needs to know where the traffic is at in the intersection,” said Kevin Nursick, spokesperson for the DOT. “Cameras see all legs of the intersection and tell the signal controller where the traffic or cars or motorcycles are on a visual basis.” The state chooses four project locations each year, one in each corner of the state. This year between 10 and 20 traffic signals in East Lyme will

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Westbrook I-95 Welcome Center Reopens For Labor Day Weekend

IN THE REGION — The Westbrook Welcome Center is open and staffed for Labor Day weekend for the first time in more than three years. “We are excited to have all six welcome centers open again and thankful for Governor Lamont’s emphasis on this project,” said Randy Fiveash, the director of the Office of Tourism in the Department of Economic and Community Development. The other five welcome centers – Darien, Greenwich, North Stonington, West Willington and Danbury – were all re-opened on a 24/7 basis on July 1, the start of the new fiscal year, with a budget allocation of

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East Lyme Has Highest Accident Rate On I-95 East of New Haven… Why?

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IN THE REGION — In 2017, East Lyme had more crashes per car traveling through Connecticut on I-95 than any other town east of New Haven. For every 146,619 cars that drove through East Lyme in 2017, there was one crash, bringing the total number of crashes to 177, according to data from the Connecticut Crash Repository hosted by the University of Connecticut. Only two other towns in the region had such frequent car crashes – Groton at 172,711 cars per crash and Stonington at 167,319 cars per crash. Most rates are much lower, near or well above 300,000 cars

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Shore Line East Resumes Regular Service, with 25% Fewer Riders

IN THE REGION — Over the last two years, ridership on Shore Line East has fallen 25 percent as commuter service has been disrupted by an extensive undercutting project to prevent gravel from burying the tracks. By May, the average number of weekday riders had fallen to 1,340 and on weekends to  just 767. For comparison, a single 10-car Metro-North train carries 1,000 passengers.   “Once you’ve lost a rider because you’re not providing train service or the bus substitutions are not reliable or slow, it is hard to gain that rider back,” said Jim Cameron, the founder of the Commuter

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Letter: Northeast Rail Corridor – Still Alive?

That was, at least, until Connecticut’s junior Senator Chris Murphy spoke before a crowd of two hundred at the Greater Mystic Chamber of Commerce on May 31 in Groton. He argued, “…if we continue to let the northeast rail corridor atrophy, then Connecticut’s economy will atrophy.” “Every year,” he went on, “we always argue whether we’re going to give Amtrak $1.2 billion or $1.4 billion when you need $100 billion for this type of project.” The first step, he said, is to modernize commercial rail infrastructure in eastern Connecticut. He likes, he admitted, “big ideas.”

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