Searching For the Undo Button

For a long time, I kept a Plan B pill in the same small silver jewelry case where I kept my laxatives. I’d received the box as a bat mitzvah present, and it was engraved with some Hebrew phrase I’d long forgotten the meaning of. Using it for this purpose felt appropriate, since I never felt more like a woman than when I was desperate to forget something I’d let inside me. I took Plan B cavalierly and callously, making jokes to my friend in line at the pharmacy. We’d read the articles that said taking it too many times

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A New Pop Culture Climate

In December of 2018, I got around to watching the much-hyped indie movie favorite from Paul Schrader, First Reformed. I did so, purely coincidentally, maybe a day or two after I had finished reading Richard Powers’s eventual Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Overstory. Though I would heartily recommend both movie and book, I am not sure the rapid-fire combination is entirely advisable. They were both remarkably powerful pieces of culture, and both are elegies for a dying—a murdered—planet. They are keening laments, both intensely visceral and difficult to look away from. I recall sitting up late into the night after the credits rolled

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Brand Ambassadors

The first time someone recognized me and asked to take a picture with me I started crying! She was visiting all the way from India with her family, and the fact that this little girl halfway across the world knew my name and was touring Harvard because I had inspired her really got to me … It’s unreal. Sienna Santer, College Content Creator Nicholas Chae’s “A Day In My Life at Princeton University,” which has 1.1 million views on YouTube, begins with a shot of his iPhone alarm ringing. Chae, a first-semester freshman, gets himself ready, studies for a French

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The Vertical Wasteland

If you wander around the new Moynihan Train Hall in midtown Manhattan, at some point you’ll encounter “The Hive,” an art installation located inside the West 34th Street entrance. Dangling from the vaulted ceilings like stalactite are glittering replicas of upside-down skyscrapers, futuristic shapes that stretch up to nine feet long. Their pretend windows are illuminated by hidden LED lights. The exhibit’s aluminum base plate ripples with the reflection of passersby. The piece was designed as an idealistic ode to the modern skyline, the beautiful logic of busy central districts, the “huge collaboration [required] to make everyone survive,” as one

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