Mystic Seaport’s Steve White Takes a Bow

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MYSTIC — “It was a perfect moment, an intersection of all these key things coming together,” Steve White said in a phone conversation with CT Examiner on December 19. “The Charles W. Morgan needed to be restored, and then the question became how much should she be restored. It was clear to me as a new person here that if we’re going to restore her that much that this would certainly be the only and singular opportunity to take her back to sea.”  For White, 66, who announced on December 17 that he will retire in 2020 as president and

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Public-Private Partnership Seeds 100,000 Oysters in Niantic River

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EAST LYME — Shellfish experts deposited about 100,000 juvenile oysters into the Niantic River on Saturday, as part of a $10,000 public-private partnership plan by the Waterford-East Lyme Shellfish Commission to bolster the river’s oyster population in an effort to increase recreational fishing and improve water quality. “This is the first seeding that we’ll do,” said Peter Harris, chair of the shellfish commission. “We’re pretty confident that we’ll be successful.”  Harris said that this could be the first of multiple seeding if successful. “When they grow out to adults they will set seed and repopulate the area if it’s successful,”

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Finding a Turkey for the Thanksgiving Holiday

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IN THE REGION — Thanksgiving falls late this year, but turkey sales start early, and shops across southeast Connecticut are offering a variety of choices and price points for home cooks preparing for November 28. Walt’s Food Market in Old Saybrook is preparing for the holiday by making over 800 pounds of gravy, starting a full two weeks before Thanksgiving. “It’s nothing, but turkey, we don’t do any of that fake canned turkey gravy,” said Walt’s meat manager Dave Crosby. “We make our own stock from scratch, boil it down and make it that way all from turkey necks and

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Stonington’s Chesebrough Sets out an Ambitious Agenda for her First Term

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STONINGTON — “Working on the shorter-term plan with a longer-term vision mixed in,” was how Danielle Chesebrough — who will be sworn in as Stonington’s first selectman on November 19 — described her state of mind Friday morning. “Initially what I’m trying to do is meet with all the directors… all of my ‘direct reports.’ But, I also want to identify and meet with other people throughout the org chart,” she said in a phone conversation with CT Examiner. “I think it’s really important to meet with people at all different levels — they have all different vantage points.” She

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Chesebrough Calls Coastal Resiliency a Top Priority, Emphasizes Fiscal Preparedness

STONINGTON — With a diverse background that includes two years of experience on the Board of Finance, three-plus years on the Economic Development Commission and eight years as a senior analyst in investor relations for the United Nations, Danielle Chesebrough, an unaffiliated candidate endorsed by the local Democratic Party for first selectman, said her top three priorities if she is elected on November 5, will be coastal resiliency, economic development and fiscal preparedness. Chesebrough, 36, moved to Stonington halfway through her sophomore year of high school. She has a husband, Sam, and three children ages two, four and six. She

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Prue Puts Focus on Aging Infrastructure, Careful Timeline on Coastal Investment

STONINGTON — If elected first selectman, Republican John Prue said he will focus on improving the town’s aging infrastructure, completing capital projects that have already begun and promoting an atmosphere of unity and trust among the town’s three villages. Prue, 57, has served for two years as selectman. He also served for two years on the Zoning Board of Appeals and six years on the Planning and Zoning Commission including one as chair. “Our Grand List has been growing slower than municipal expenditures, which means our taxes have been rising — therefore, no matter what, we need new development to

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Turner Show Opens at Mystic … “as good an overview … as can be imagined.”

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At just under a hundred works — ninety-two watercolors and four oils — the William Turner show now at the Mystic Seaport Museum is as good an overview of the artist’s career in the medium as can be imagined. And what an overview it is of one of the greatest and most inventive watercolorists curated by the Tate’s Manton Senior Curator of British Art 1790-1850, David Blayney Brown. Turner intended to secure his legacy by leaving a hundred oils to the National Gallery, but in 1856 the Chancery Court decided that was an insufficient bequest to Great Britain, and the

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Mystic Sewer Amnesty Yields Modest Returns

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STONINGTON — Under the town’s announced sump pump amnesty, sixty-five property owners in Mystic admitted to having a sump pump discharging into the municipal sewer system, an illegal practice. The amnesty is part of a broader effort by Stonington to address sewer capacity issues. Stonington Water Pollution Control Authority Director Douglas Nettleton sent a letter in early August to 1,400 property owners in Mystic offering amnesty from August 15 to September 30 to any violators. “If you (responded) within that time period, you would be exempt from any penalties later on down the road. If you didn’t take advantage of

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The Loneliness and Isolation of New Motherhood

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Surrounded by new life – screaming, crying, unappeasable new life at that – can be far from the idyllic picture of new motherhood often portrayed, said Taryn Zarnetske, a clinical social worker at Yale New Haven Hospital. It can actually be an incredibly lonely and isolating time in a mother’s life. “It’s one of those things that can be a little bit taboo to talk about honestly,” Zarnetske said. “But, if you ask a mom if she felt lonely she says yes. She almost always said she felt really isolated being on maternity leave.” For many women the postpartum period

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A First Stab at the Best Beef in Connecticut

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The first bite, cooked to just medium rare, was straight-forward beefy, coarse-textured, with a notable (not unpleasing) chew. Second and third bites carved from the marbled “cap” portion of the steak were unctuous and brought just a hint of blue cheese funk that can dominate much longer-aged beef. The 21-day dry-aged rib steak was from Grass & Bone, a hip craft butcher and dining spot just on the edge of the tourist bubble in Mystic (and some of the best coffee, at MBar), the brainchild of Dan Meiser and James Wayman, who in recent years have opened some of the

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