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In the Region - page 16

Posted on in In the Region

State Agrees to Pay Larger Share of Benefits in Move to Preserve the State Trooper Program

IN THE REGION — Beginning in fiscal year 2020, the state will pick up 50 percent of the fringe benefit costs of resident state troopers, allowing small towns dependent on the program to limit further cost increases. “Small towns are thrilled that the budget addresses longstanding concerns regarding the Resident State Trooper program, which is… Keep Reading

Posted on in In the Region/Region 4

Regional Government Gets its Own Budget Line

“Previously our funding has been a line item in the Office of Policy and Management’s budget. Now it is in legislation,” said James Butler, the executive director for the Southeastern Connecticut Council of Government (SECCOG). “It will be harder to zero it out or eliminate it now that it is in legislation.” Keep Reading

Posted on in In the Region

Formica and Carney Host Open House in Old Lyme

Speaking off-the-cuff and from a Senate Republican handout based on information provided by the nonpartisan Office of Legislative Research, Formica and Carney said that the state would end the legislative session with a $458 million deficit, a number of regressive tax increases on the horizon to fill in the gap, and the question of tolls deferred to a special session sometime this summer. Keep Reading

Posted on in In the Region/Region 4

Budget Language Adds Flexibility For School Savings

IN THE REGION — Between 2007 and 2017, the total public primary and secondary school enrollment in Connecticut dropped by 46,110 students, a decline of 8 percent. Essex, Deep River and Old Saybrook all have seen much greater losses with 32, 16 and 12 percent respectively. None of these declines were previously considered drastic enough… Keep Reading

Posted on in Groton/Interview

Reiner Aims to Set the Table

With thousands of hires expected at Electric Boat in the coming decade, Jon Reiner, Director of Planning and Development for the Town of Groton, describes his work as “setting the table” for investment in housing, business opportunities and redevelopment of older buildings and neighborhoods. Reiner, who was hired by the town in 2014, said his focus has been on finding out what Groton residents want and shaping the town’s future through marketing and zoning tools that attract the right kind of investment. Keep Reading

Posted on in Waterford

Waterford Considers Loosening FEMA Compliance

“What we’re finding is if residents have to replace a roof, say, on a smaller beach cottage that was converted to a full-time residence over the years, they can get to the 50 percent quickly, so we’re trying to find a reasonable balance,” she said. “We want to make sure we’re not being too lax and also make sure people can reasonably maintain their homes and the fabric of the neighborhood and community.” Keep Reading

Posted on in Lyme

Restoring Habitat on the Lower Connecticut River

Standing in the middle of Lord’s Cove, on the edge of the Connecticut River, you can see thousands of salt march bulrushes poking up through the muck everywhere, a plant that has appeared on the Connecticut and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services Rare Species lists for more than 40 years. Keep Reading

Posted on in New London

Breaking Ground on Affordable Housing in New London

“What this represents to us is not only saving a structure that many, many people in the city have memories of coming to... We have nearly 1,000 units of housing in the planning stages and at least 20 percent of that is going to be affordable housing. It’s very, very important going forward that we provide the housing for all the socioeconomic levels that make up this great city,” New London Mayor Mike Passero said. Keep Reading

Posted on in In the Region

Murphy, Reiner, Meiser on Growing Southeast Connecticut

At the “Groton Business Update” event, Murphy spoke to about 200 chamber members at the Mystic Marriott Hotel and Spa in Groton. He was joined by speakers Jonathan Reiner, director of planning and development for the Town of Groton, and Dan Meiser, Stonington-based restaurateur and chair of the Connecticut Restaurant Association. Keep Reading

Posted on in Old Saybrook

Old Saybrook Faces Tough Choices on Septic System Pollution

More than 60 percent of the nitrogen load flowing from the Oyster River into Indian Harbor off of Old Saybrook is from septic systems, according to a study by Marine Scientist Jamie Vaudrey from the University of Connecticut. Part of the problem is that the soil in Old Saybrook is poorly suited for filtering nitrogen. There also simply isn’t enough of it to provide sufficient buffering. Keep Reading

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