Surveying Traffic Stops in Southeast Connecticut

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Suburban towns usually have more traffic stops than urban centers, said Ken Barone, a project manager at the Institute for Municipal and Regional Policy at Central Connecticut State University. “It simply because of the needs in the department. In cities like New London there is a significantly higher call volume, so officers do not have the time to do traffic enforcement,” said Barone who has managed Connecticut’s traffic stop data for seven years. “The other thing is leadership, some police chiefs hammer on traffic enforcement.” During a ride along in July, Officer Kevin Roche of the Old Lyme police department

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Westbrook I-95 Welcome Center Reopens For Labor Day Weekend

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IN THE REGION — The Westbrook Welcome Center is open and staffed for Labor Day weekend for the first time in more than three years. “We are excited to have all six welcome centers open again and thankful for Governor Lamont’s emphasis on this project,” said Randy Fiveash, the director of the Office of Tourism in the Department of Economic and Community Development. The other five welcome centers – Darien, Greenwich, North Stonington, West Willington and Danbury – were all re-opened on a 24/7 basis on July 1, the start of the new fiscal year, with a budget allocation of

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East Lyme Has Highest Accident Rate On I-95 East of New Haven… Why?

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IN THE REGION — In 2017, East Lyme had more crashes per car traveling through Connecticut on I-95 than any other town east of New Haven. For every 146,619 cars that drove through East Lyme in 2017, there was one crash, bringing the total number of crashes to 177, according to data from the Connecticut Crash Repository hosted by the University of Connecticut. Only two other towns in the region had such frequent car crashes – Groton at 172,711 cars per crash and Stonington at 167,319 cars per crash. Most rates are much lower, near or well above 300,000 cars

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Shore Line East Resumes Regular Service, with 25% Fewer Riders

IN THE REGION — Over the last two years, ridership on Shore Line East has fallen 25 percent as commuter service has been disrupted by an extensive undercutting project to prevent gravel from burying the tracks. By May, the average number of weekday riders had fallen to 1,340 and on weekends to  just 767. For comparison, a single 10-car Metro-North train carries 1,000 passengers.   “Once you’ve lost a rider because you’re not providing train service or the bus substitutions are not reliable or slow, it is hard to gain that rider back,” said Jim Cameron, the founder of the Commuter

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Letter: Northeast Rail Corridor – Still Alive?

That was, at least, until Connecticut’s junior Senator Chris Murphy spoke before a crowd of two hundred at the Greater Mystic Chamber of Commerce on May 31 in Groton. He argued, “…if we continue to let the northeast rail corridor atrophy, then Connecticut’s economy will atrophy.” “Every year,” he went on, “we always argue whether we’re going to give Amtrak $1.2 billion or $1.4 billion when you need $100 billion for this type of project.” The first step, he said, is to modernize commercial rail infrastructure in eastern Connecticut. He likes, he admitted, “big ideas.”

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