Micro-Lofts Planned for Mixed-Use Preservation Project in Historic Green Street Locale

NEW LONDON — The owner of a building on Green Street that briefly housed a Black-owned lending institution and civic group in the 1920s will use tax credits to renovate the structure into “micro-loft” apartments and a restaurant space. The State Historic Preservation Office last week approved developer Brian Lyman’s application for Historic Preservation tax credits that offset 30 percent of the projected $1,050,000 project cost. He has also applied to the National Park Service for a federal credit to offset an additional 20 percent of costs. Lyman said that the second and third stories of the building at 38

More

Restoration of Historic Killingworth Congregational Church Marks 200-Year Church-State Divide

KILLINGWORTH — The dome ceiling of the Congregational church is 200-year-old plaster.  From inside the sanctuary, the only sign of concern is a water stain near the base of a wall where the plaster has started to crack.  It’s not a superficial issue.  After climbing a narrow staircase into the steeple, the keys – the plaster that oozes between cracks in the wooden structure, keeping the rest of the plaster in place – have broken off. That’s what needs to be secured, said Charlie Smith, co-chair of the Killingworth Congregational Church’s fundraising committee.  “If a piece of the plaster falls,

More

Inland Wetlands Considers Complex off Spencer Plains Road

The Old Saybrook Inland Wetlands and Watercourses Commission agreed to move forward with an area electrical contractor’s application to build an office and warehouse building off of Interstate 95. The commission unanimously voted to accept and consider John Muir’s application for approval to build a 12,000 square foot building to serve as office and warehouse space, and a parking lot within 100 feet of wetlands on property he has contracted to buy at the corner of Spencer Plains and Buck Hill roads, just north of I-95 at exit 66. Muir said that he will use some of the space for

More

Widely Varying Totals Cast Doubt on Reported $400+ Million Impact on Municipal Finances from COVID-19

As advocates for cities and towns push for federal dollars in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a state-sponsored survey of towns across Connecticut reports widely varying financial impacts. The results of an April survey from the Office of Policy and Management paint an apparently overall bleak picture of local finances, with municipalities reporting an estimated total of more than $400 million of impacts to local revenues. Office of Policy and Management Spokesman Chris McClure cautioned against viewing the survey as a definitive account of municipal finances.  “This report helps us gauge the order of magnitude for municipalities’ potential losses and

More

Environmentalists Seek Local Volunteers to Pull Invasive Water Chestnuts on the Connecticut River

Summer is the season for pulling out water chestnuts along the Connecticut River, and groups concerned with the prolific invasive plant are getting ready and organizing volunteers.  The Connecticut River Conservancy aims to promote and coordinate removal of the invasive European water chestnut from the river’s source in northern New Hampshire, down to the Long Island Sound. The conservancy works with local groups like Friends of Whalebone Cove, which has taken on the task of removing invasive plants from Whalebone Cove, Selden Cove and Selden Creek, near Hadlyme. “What we’re doing is a small part of what they’re trying to

More

Lawmakers Pledge to Move Quickly, as Accountability Task Force Discusses Police Reforms

The Police Transparency and Accountability Task Force, established last year as part of a legislative reform bill, met on Monday for the first time since March.  As task force members discussed ideas to address public concerns with the police – including ways to increase accountability and ways to limit police encounters in the first place – lawmakers said they couldn’t wait for the group’s final report before they start moving legislation to address police accountability. During the task force’s discussion during the Monday meeting, Milford Police Chief Keith Mello and Norwalk Police Chief Thomas Kulhawik both pointed to the mediation

More

Lengthy Backlog for Firearms Appeals as Hearings Stretch into 2022

According to a recently released state audit of the Office of Governmental Accountability, Connecticut residents can wait up to 18 months to receive an appeal hearing after a firearms permit has been revoked or denied. Despite holding more meetings to address a chronic backlog of cases, the Board of Firearms Permit Examiners – the state board that hears the appeals – has struggled for more than a decade to keep up with an increasing caseload. Currently, the board has a backlog of 631 cases, and is scheduling new hearings in January 2022 for people who had their licenses revoked. That

More

As Federal Aid Expires and Businesses are Slow to Reopen, Officials Discuss Changes to the Paycheck Protection Program

With summer fast approaching, Connecticut’s multibillion-dollar tourism industry is still largely shuttered. But as businesses gradually reopen over the next month, increased costs, wary customers and rigid rules on federal aid may make the process more difficult for businesses that have already lost two or three months of revenue. Possible changes to the troubled federal Paycheck Protection Program may ease some of that burden for tourism-driven businesses, but they will still need to clear one additional hurdle after they are allowed to reopen: convincing customers that it’s safe to come out. Sen. Richard Blumenthal told industry stakeholders that he’s optimistic

More

Connecticut Pushes Ahead on Transportation Projects as Revenues Plummet

Traffic has dropped 50 percent across the state and nation, oil prices have collapsed and state transportation departments relying on fuel taxes are losing revenue – but the Connecticut Department of Transportation isn’t cutting back on any projects just yet. Transportation officials in states across the country – including Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania – are already scaling back planned highway projects or furloughing workers as they expect more people staying home will mean less revenue from key sources of funding, including the gas tax.  Connecticut Department of Transportation Spokesman Kevin Nursick said the state hasn’t cutback yet.

More
1 4 5 6